New ways to fight HIV and tuberculosis emerge at AIDS conference

BOSTON—Some people naturally handle HIV infection better than others, but only two clear genetic explanations have ever been found. Now, a new study reported here today at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections finds a third: a genetic signature that leads to a better control of the virus in people of African descent. It could clarify sometimes puzzling differences in the way the disease progresses in untreated people, and it might offer clues about new treatment strategies. Read more

hiv_16x9

Monkeys reveal new clues toward elusive HIV vaccine and cure

BOSTON—Despite enormous efforts over more than 30 years, HIV/AIDS researchers have yet to develop either a vaccine or cure for the disease. But they have made progress in monkey experiments, and two studies reported here this week at the largest annual U.S. HIV/AIDS conference created serious buzz. Read more

monkey_16x9

A daily pill can prevent HIV infections. Why don’t more people use it?

BOSTON—There’s no question that a simple regimen of a single daily pill can slash HIV infections in people at risk. But although millions of people around the world could benefit, only 200,000 are prescribed what’s called pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, and 75% of them are in the United States. The disparity was the focus of anguished discussions this week at the largest annual U.S. HIV/AIDS conference. “I’m frustrated,” says Linda-Gail Bekker, a researcher at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. “We have nearly 1700 infections every week in young women and girls, and this might be a way to throttle this.” Read more

hires-image_16x9